Tag: "identity theft"

What are The Most Common Identity Theft Techniques

According to the FTC, the most common identity theft techniques normally relate to the fraudulent use of credit cards, and the opening of bank accounts or other types of financial accounts in someone else’s name.

These types of account of venues to obtain fraudulent loans or credits which are credited to the person whose identity has been stolen.

There are obviously other types of identity theft, but it is a relatively new form of crime, and is evolving in different ways, depending upon how people access information.

Credit Card Theft

Most credit card companies will now automatically reimburse anyone whose card has been used fraudulently, normally without any question or challenge.

This is not about them being mister nice guy, it has been part of a calculated attempt to increase the growth and use of credit cards over the last 20 or 30 years.

Credit card fraud is not new, it has been going on since credit cards were first used. What is new is the scale of it, or the potential scale. Giving someone your credit card number, either of the phone or online has become as commonplace as giving people your telephone number.

In addition, many companies who stole your credit card are at risk of being hacked, or of using your information in some other way to an individual who should have it.

Either way, many years ago credit card companies realised that in order to encourage people to use them they had to have almost a blanket policy of giving their customers total trust in them, and a big part of that was why kill off any charges that were deemed to be fraudulent.

In addition, credit card companies go to extraordinary lengths to try and prevent credit card fraud, often through monitoring patterns of use and either blocking use of a card if they deem it to be fraudulent, or contacting the cardholder to check that their use of it is genuine.

Fraudulent Bank Accounts

Many people think of identity theft in this context, where someone’s identity has been stolen and a bank account or other type of financial account opened in their name. This certainly happens, but the scale of it is difficult to judge.

What is clear is that when it does happen it can be incredibly difficult to sort out. It can involve a huge amount of detailed  forensic activity, in order to create an audit trail that can prove fraud has taken place.

Whilst many banks and financial institutions are  often notoriously cautious when it comes to opening accounts and lending money, there are many who are not,  particularly online.

In order to facilitate identity theft of this type, the criminal must have access to certain amount of personal and financial information of the individual, and in truth the easier it is for someone to obtain this information, either online or in real life, the more at risk any individual is having their identity stolen and used in criminal activity.

How do You Fix Identity Theft?

The very idea of identity theft either really scares people, or is dismissed as being a bit of a project fear campaign. This is often because of a misunderstanding of what the term identity theft can mean. It can either mean wholesale theft of someone’s identity, credit card fraud, tax fraud, child benefit fraud etc.

The first step in fixing identity theft is to stop any more fraud occurring once you have discovered that it has taken place. This is in part about damage limitation, but also making sure that you put a block on a continuing and recurring crime.

Fixing identity theft first of all depends upon identifying where the theft has occurred. This means clarifying which companies have been involved in terms of where your personal or financial details have been held, and notifying them some type of fraud has occurred.

This means that once you have notified these companies they should be able to put a stop on your account, meaning that no new fraud activity should be allowed, and if it is you should not be held liable for it. This may also mean closing your accounts completely and opening new ones with new account numbers and names.

Fraud Alerts on Credit Reports

It is important to notify one of the three major credit bureaus, Experian, Equifax and Transunion. Which ever one you contact, they will notify the other two. They can put a fraud alert on your credit report, which makes it much harder for anyone to open any type of account in your name.

FTC

If living in the US, notify the FTC who have a specially dedicated website where identity theft can be notified and help sort and given. If living in Canada or any other country, check to see if the government has a national or federal system for registering cases of identity theft.

Most countries recognise that identity theft is quite often a national issue, and quite often an international issue, and have taken steps to make sure that as broad a range of help as possible is available.

Police

Many people will notify the local police department or law enforcement agency, that a crime has been committed.

Some people do not bother as they think there is little that the police can do about it. However, as with any crime, notifying the relevant law enforcement agency is always a good idea. They have experience of all types of crime and may be able to offer practical advice, as well as being involved in helping to solve it in different ways.

The above steps are in many ways about trying to prevent further criminal activity once the case of an identity theft has been realised and recognised. The next step is to try and limit the damage that has already been done, and try to claim back compensation for crimes committed in the individual’s name.

New Accounts

Quite often identity theft is about someone’s identity having been stolen, and new bank or financial accounts opened in their name. These accounts are then used to obtain loans or credit on a fraudulent basis. The first step for is to get these accounts closed. Identifying where these accounts are can sometimes be quite tricky, but it is important that this is done quickly.

Stress to the bank financial institution that an identity theft has taken place, and that these accounts need to be frozen and closed. Obtain written confirmation by post or email the bank institution has complied with your request.

Removing Fraudulent Charges

Once the account has been identified as fraudulent, the next step is to  have all charges on that account removed from your name. This means  making sure the bank financial institution has complied with your request as above close account, and in so doing all charges from your name.

This may sometimes be quite difficult to achieve.  Depending upon whether it is a bank or credit card company or other type of financial institution they may have committed a significant amount of money to this bogus account, and may be reluctant to simply write it off on the basis that you are saying it is a fraudulent account.

This is where identity theft can get complicated, as sometimes banks or credit card companies will take the attitude that it is possible you are simply trying to get out of repaying a loan or credit card by claiming identity theft. It can sometimes be quite a tortuous process to prove it.

Identity Theft Insurance

Many companies offer some type of identity theft insurance, either as a stand-alone policy, as part of a home insurance policy or as part of a crime prevention policy. The coverage under all these types of policy is normally fairly similar, and although clear as to what it is, is in many ways not that helpful.

The main type of insurance cover normally helps people by providing assistance in the areas mentioned above. This can be about contacting banks and financial institutions where fraud has occurred, notifying the main credit bureaus and liaising with various regulatory bodies and agencies where appropriate.

There is also quite often some type of credit monitoring service available, or made available for a certain period of time.

There is normally some type of financial indemnity that can relate to attorney fees with regard to legally unpicking some of the above areas

 

 

 

 

Does Identity Theft Protection Work?

A number of companies offer identity theft protection services, some of them quite costly, and in truth offering protection that has some value but is fairly limited in reality if your identity has been stolen.

Firstly it is important to look at how much of a risk people people are at in terms of having their identity stolen. Bureau of Justice statistics for 2014 estimate that some 7% of US residents were victims of identity theft in that year. By some measures that is quite a high estimate, but it is important to break it down into what it really means.

What is Identity Theft?

Many people have a view of identity theft is quite dramatic, a view often fuelled by companies providing identity theft protection services. The reality is that for most people identity theft is a real possibility, and is more likely to be around theft of credit card numbers etc, as well as the risk of people opening bank accounts in someone else’s name.

There are a number of things people can do to protect themselves, especially in these two areas. It is also important to make a distinction between what people can do to protect themselves against identity theft happening, and the identity theft protection that some companies offer, which is more about dealing with the problem once it has happened.

The cover that these companies offer is normally to do with some type of credit monitoring after the theft has actually happened.

There are also offer some type of power of attorney process that allows them to try and deal with the damage of identity theft in your name. Whilst this may in theory be of some benefit, mentally and emotionally and in your identity over to someone else again what has been stolen may seem quite weird some people.

Preventing Identity Theft

That you can protect whilst no one can guarantee that you can protect yourself against identity theft that are a number of things you can do that can help.

Firstly make sure that your credit card company covers you for an authorised use the card.

Most credit card companies do nowadays. It has fuelled the use of credit cards both online and off-line for people to use for everyday purchases. What it means in reality is that if anyone uses your credit card number however they have got it when it got company will automatically write off the loss and remove the charge from your account.

Most of the major credit card companies are pretty good in this area, and realise that it benefits consumer confidence hugely to know that they are automatically covered without dispute. It is worth checking however with your credit card company that this is their policy.

The other significant area of identity theft is people opening bank accounts and be able to obtain loans  in someone else’s name. There are certain categories of people terms of age and income seem to be more at risk, and it is worth doing some research to see where current identity theft statistics are heading in that direction.

The most important area of prevention and protection lies in good old common sense. In order for someone to steal your identity they really need to have some unique information about you, such as your Social Security number, National Insurance number, passport number and photograph,  driving licence number etc.

The best way you can protect this information is not to share it with anyone online, and make sure that all correspondence involving any sensitive information  is sent and received by normal mail.

There is continual pressure to do everything online nowadays, especially by organisations such as banks which set as a way of cutting costs considerably. Make sure that you keep the option of corresponding and doing business by normal mail, including things such as bank statements.

Whilst paper information can be accessed and hacked by criminals, that to some extent has always been the case. The best way to protect yourself is to make sure that information is not shared online, and make sure that all paper versions of it is shredded prior to disposal.

Home owners insurance

A number of homeowners insurance policies offer some type of identity theft protection either as an add-on or as an integral part of the policy. This to an extent can be a bit of window dressing, but can also include road to useful features.

One of the most common is access to some type of free credit monitoring service which can alert you if they suspicious activity regarding your account, or if something like a bank account is opened in your name.

What these policies offer should be seen in the context of what you yourself can do as well. For example,  virtually everyone has a legal right to see their credit report at least once a year, in order to check it is accurate and have any mistakes rectified. This is a good way of seeing what information is held on you and by whom.

Some insurance policies also provide a degree of financial indemnity cover to help you pursue actions to recover your identity in the event of theft, including monies spent on attorney fees etc.

 

Cyber Insurance Cost Examples – Equifax

The data breach at Equifax sent shockwaves throughout the Internet, and throughout the financial community generally. This is in large part is because of the huge amount of sensitive data that all credit rating agencies hold on individuals, and the fairly natural assumption that data is kept safe.

According to CNN, the breach involved the theft of personal data of approximately 145,000,000 people, and the theft was only revealed two months after it happened.

Whilst the delay in revealing the theft was not as long as that of Yahoo or some other companies, two months is still a huge time in terms of the risk of identity theft. With the breach of Equi the risk of identity theft is probably as strong as it possibly could be, and any delay is potentially hugely important.

Equifax Data

All the main credit rating agencies potentially hold a huge amount of personal and financial information on  millions of people worldwide.  Their role is to provide an accurate assessment of an individual’s creditworthiness, that can give a value to document to any bank or financial student looking to lend them money or any type of credit.

Anyone applying for any type of credit or loan  will have had their application assessed and determined on the basis of a credit score/credit report which will have been prepared by a company such as Equifax

In preparing such a report, Equifax would collect a significant amount of data on an individual. Such information would normally include their name, the date of birth, address, their telephone number, that Social Security number or their social insurance number, their drivers license details, their passport and their current and previous employers.

They would also look at the individuals credit history. This would include information relating to payment history of any credit loan or arrangement, the use of current available credit to them, the length of their credit history, the number of enquiries they have made regarding obtaining credit, and the type of credit they use this frequently.

Their financial history would also be looked at. This would involve obtaining information from public records regarding things such as bankruptcy. Also look at their banking history regarding overdrafts, bounced checks and any closed accounts.

They will also look at things such as loans, mortgages, lines of credit, store cards and credit cards and worst of all payday loans.

Anyone looking at this type of report would realise pretty quickly that the amount of information held on an individual by a credit bureau is massive.

Not only in the size and scale of it, but in the scope that it provides for identity theft. The fact that there could be a breach to the extent that there was highlights the enormity of the type of centralisation of this information.

Equifax Breach Causes

According to CNN, Equifax blamed the breach on one single individual, advising Congress that this individual had subsequently been fired !   It is perhaps more scary that a breach of this size and scale could have been effected by one individual.

Any cyber security policy that is meant to protect this type and scale of data has surely got to have some type of safeguards built in,  so that any individual doesn’t have either this type of responsibility for this type of power on their own

Identity Theft – What Is It?

Someone who is a victim of identity theft is someone who has had their identity stolen in some way, and the criminal has used that identity to fraudulently obtain some type of benefit, such as a bank loan, credit card or other financial gain in the name of the person whose identity they have stolen.

Identity theft is widespread, although the scale of it is difficult to assess financially as a lot of banks and financial institutions do not like to advertise the fact that they had been misled and had money stolen from them.

The risks of identity theft are well  known, and there is a lots of good advice available about how to try and prevent identity theft, and there is some insurance protection available in the event that someone’s identity has been stolen, although the help that is offered is in reality fairly minimal.

Risk of Identity Theft

The crime of identity theft  occurs when a criminal is able to obtain unique information about an individual, and then use that information to clone their identity. This cloned identity then becomes liable for a wide range of financial fraud, perpetrated by the criminal in the name of the individual’s identity that has been stolen.

In order to steal an identity, it is generally accepted that there are a number of specific pieces of information that someone needs.

These normally relate to areas of information that are unique to that individual, and cannot apply to anyone else, such as their date of birth, their social security number or national insurance number, passport etc.

In reality, a criminal will try and obtain as much information about that individual as possible, in order to build up a picture that can be used to effectively represent them in a fraudulent manner.

Preventing Identity Theft

There is no sure way to prevent identity theft, but there are certain things you can do to make it more difficult.

Perhaps the most important is to make sure that all information that is unique to you as an individual regarding tax and social security, pension benefits, medical benefits etc is sent to you by regular post rather than email.

This may seem fairly basic but the is in truth probably the most practical way of preventing unique information falling into the hands of criminal.

The other things that you can do are to monitor things such as bank accounts, credit cards etc, to see any unusual activity.

This can also apply to any strange letters or visits or phone calls  that might seem to imply unusual activity regarding your finances.

Any warning sign that your credit is being altered in some way that seems to you unlikely should alert you to the possibility of some type of identity theft or identity theft tampering.

Dealing With Identity Theft

If you discover that your identity has been stolen, there are a number of steps that you should immediately following. Firstly is to notify your bank or credit card company you believe your identity has been stolen, and ask for their assistance in helping to resolve it.

Make sure that they are willing to work with you to sort out the issue without penalising you by way of freezing  your account or anything similar.

Make sure you register the identity theft online, there is normally a government backed websites available, that is either a government site or a law enforcement site that allows you to lock the fact that you have had your identity stolen, and should be able to provide some assistance in terms of helping to recover it.

If your stolen identity has been used to fraudulently obtain a loan or a credit card, make sure you collect all the information you can about it before it is completely disabled and shut down to  help track and trace the initial fraud.

Identity Theft Insurance

Some type of identity theft insurance is normally offered  by way of a rider or endorsement to a home or homeowners or renters insurance policy. The cover it gives normally focuses on some type of financial assistance for help with attorney/lawyers fees, assistance with credit monitoring, acting as a liaison with banks, insurance companies to try and resolve ongoing fraud issues etc.

Whilst this help can be of some value, the real help that is needed with virtually types of identity fraud is unravelling fraud that has taken place, and getting banks and financial institutions to believe that it has actually happened in the first place.

There is a lot of anecdotal evidence that implies that banks tend to want the individual to prove their identity has been stolen to an exacting degree before they are willing to consider the possibility that fraud has taken place.

Proving identity theft  has taken place can be quite difficult, especially where it is the sort of crime where you are up against a number of institutions that initially may well not believe you at all. This is an area where some type of identity theft insurance would be really invaluable, but unfortunately most current insurance policies do not really provide much value in this area.

Identity Theft and Cyber Insurance

Whilst the scale of identity theft is hard to assess, what is fairly clear is that the growth of cybercrime and cyber security means that the amount of identity theft and fraud is bound to increase fairly substantially over the next few years.

It is becoming easier and easier to know more and more about people, whether they want you to or not.

Some of this is around information gathered from social networks, and what people post online about themselves, privately and professionally. The growth of the Internet of things, and of big data, means that the amount of information available are people, with or without their knowledge, is going to explode into a level that is almost incomprehensible at todays levels of knowledge.

Sometimes this information is gathered through hacking into corporations websites where personal data such as credit card etc has been stolen.

Current cyber insurance policies are mainly aimed at businesses and organisations, and the insurance companies that offer best practice seem to include some type of incident management team, that includes lawyers, IT specialists, reputational management specialists etc.

The insurance policy is designed for a team to come in and take over the running of dealing with the cyber attack, both negotiating a successful outcome and restoring integrity of the system as well.

It is likely that as the rate of identity theft grows, insurance companies will need to provide some type of incident management team for individuals as well, either as part of an existing insurance policy, or as an add-on to some type of specialist cyber insurance policy.

What is Cyber Insurance and What does it Cover?

Cyber Insurance is a dedicated insurance policy, that provides both financial cover and practical help to anyone who has been victim of a cyber crime. At the moment, this type of policy is mainly aimed purely at businesses and organisations, of all sizes, any of whom could be vulnerable to a cyber attack or a data breach.

This is likely to change significantly in the near future as more and more areas of people’s individual lives are becoming vulnerable to Cyber attacks, such as their cars and their homes,  and the whole nature of cyber insurance will have to evolve to deal with these threats.

This is likely to mean that either people’s home insurance or their car insurance will have to start covering the risks of a cyber attack, or cyber insurance policies will have to evolve themselves to cover these areas.

Cyber Insurance and Indemnity

Insurance companies talk about indemnity, which is an important concept to understand. It means that the insurance policy is designed to put the insured in the same position as they were before the loss happened.

With regard to cyber insurance this means that not only is there financial protection included as part of the insurance policy, but the insurance policy  should also cover practical areas of help, such as lawyers, I.T. technicians etc. Some cyber insurance policies do include these extra areas of help, and some don’t.

Deciding what type of cyber insurance policy to buy is often determined by how much additional help is available, in the policy, in the event of a data breach, and quite often the cost will reflect this.

Cyber Crime

Cyber crime is considered one of the, if not the fastest growing area of criminal activity, and is widely evolving and quickly changing. This makes keeping up with an understanding of current threats more difficult, but there are a number of specific areas that need to be understood.

Cyber crime normally refers to a situation where information or data has been stolen from an individual or an organisation, normally known as a data breach, and there is either some financial loss as a result, some reputational damage, or something such as a ransom demand to release a computer or network that has been encrypted by a third party hacker.

Cyber Insurance Policy Cover

These are the basics of what good cyber insurance policy can offer,  although as said above, policy cover will differ significantly between insurance companies.

Incident Management Team

This is a general term for a team of specialists who can effectively take over and oversee the management of any claim as soon as there is a known reporting of a cyber crime. This can include the paying of any ransom demand,  and the restoration of any I.T. systems that have been breached as a result.

This support team  should be able to investigate the data breach, find out how it happened, restore any computer systems to full integrity, notify any clients or customers that the data breach has happened and it’s implications, and notify any relevant regulatory or statutory bodies that need to be told.

The incident management team should also include a legal team, a company that can offer access to a credit monitoring system to help with the risk of identity theft, a PR company who can help with reputational damage, and a specialist who can negotiate in the event of a kidnapping demand for a time of information or ransomware.

The Cyber Insurance Policy  will also need to have a significant financial indemnity cover, which may be needed to pay any ransom demand, loss of income  or business interruption, any type of cyber extortion or criminal activity. and any costs needed to repair the infrastructure of the computer or network system involved.

Who is at Risk ?

People often tend to associate cybercrime with big companies such as Facebook or Sony, or with governments, as data breaches that affect them tend to be the ones that get the most publicity.

In fact anyone who owns a computer that is linked to a network of any type is potentially at risk.

This applies to people who have a computer connected to the internet in their own home, as well as any computer they may use at work, it also applies to any smartphone that they may have, and quite soon will apply to the car they drive and the washing machine and refrigerator in their home as well.

Whilst it is difficult to predict trends in this area,  there is quite a lot of anecdotal evidence that cyber criminals are increasingly targeting normal everyday people for relatively small amounts of money, through various types of ransomware and threats, as well as big companies and corporations.

It is very easy to scare people into giving away small amounts of money, relatively, and in some ways this can be much more cost effective from the criminals point of view. From the point of view of the person who has experienced the crime, they are like his feel as violated as if they had either been physically attacked or their home had been broken into.

The Internet of Things

There is often reference nowadays to the internet of things, normally in the context of how it is going to change everyone’s life within the next 5 years.

What it is really referring to is that virtually every device that is not being produced is being given a wireless capability so that it can connect to the internet, as well as connecting to other devices in the home or office.

This means that anything from a refrigerator or an oven, through to a baby alarm or your car can connect to the internet and speak to other devices. There is a huge area of debate about the implications of this regarding privacy and other things,  although what is absolutely clear is that it is going to present a huge potential risk of cybercrime.

Companies love the idea of be able to connect their devices or products to the internet and other devices, and the rush to do so and get them to market often means that the security capabilities are not as carefully thought through as they should be, and that software updates are not issued or installed automatically as they should be either.

Some people like the idea of a smart home or office, other people find the idea pretty horrible. Either way in the next few years virtually everything that every individual owns or uses is likely to have the capability of connecting to the internet wirelessly.

This has huge security implications,  and is an iisue the insurance industry has not fully caught up with them. This means that most people standard home or auto insurance policy is vague about its cover in this area, and people could be left in limbo as to whether or not they are covered for any data breach that happens in their own home.

Identity Theft

The risk of identity theft has been around for some time, but with the growth of cyber crime and the amount of personal information that is shared online and through smartphones means that the risk of identity theft is probably now greater than ever.

From an insurance point of view, some home insurance policies do already provide some degree of cover for identity theft, either as part of the policy or add an additional section that can be bought at  extra cost.

The problem with the existing level of cover is that all it really does is help provide access to additional levels of credit checks and a few other useful but not really that important areas of restitution.

What most identity theft insurance protection does not do is actually help the person recover any loss that may have been incurred as a result of their identity having been stolen.

What tends to happen is that a person will have their identity stolen, and then the criminal will use that  person’s identity to obtain bank loans or credit cards or other financial benefits in that person’s name, and then run.

When  the original person discovers that their identity has been stolen and fraudulently used,  the anecdotal evidence is that most banks and other institutions are relatively unsympathetic, and the onus is on the individual to prove that they did not take out the loan or credit card etc.

This  is where an insurance policy could probably help,  but at the moment there seems to be little by way of practical benefit that most policies offer. This  may well need to change with the growth of cybercrime and cyber insurance.

Cyber Bullying

It  is worth flagging up cyber bullying as being a major element of cyber crime,  although it is not often thought of as such because the bullying tends to be emotional rather than financial.

The consequences of cyber bullying can be devastating for individuals and families, and whilst there may not be an awful lot that an insurance policy can do, the overall approach to cyber security can have a hugely beneficial effect in terms of minimising the effect of bullying, and taking steps to deal with its perpetrators.

Liability Insurance

Many  companies and organisations believe that they already have enough  cyber security insurance under different levels of liability insurance that they have already taken out. These types of insurance policies can include product liability insurance, errors and omissions insurance  or simply a public liability insurance policy.

In truth, they are unlikely to have sufficient cover, and any cover they do have is likely to be financial only, and not include any incident management team as specified above.

One of the problems is that there a lot of companies and organisations who do not have a sufficient cyber governance program, and therefore do not take cyber security as seriously as perhaps they should.

Cyber Governance

This is the name given to any structure within a company or organisation, which should represent best practice for establishing policies and procedures that both minimise the risk of, and deal with any data breach  that may occur within the company.

It can be thought of as similar to a risk management structure,  and depending upon the size and structure of the business, should have a dedicated board member partner who has specific responsibility all aspects of cyber security.

This position does not have to be a person  who has a lot of technical knowledge of computers,  but needs to be someone who can implement a policy which includes both technical and non-technical assessments of cyber security risks and how best to deal with them.

Does Identity Theft Protection Work?

Identity theft protection is one element of cyber security that occasionally tends to get overlooked.

People have heard about identity theft for quite a while, and there is a classic attitude that it is the type of disaster that only ever happens to other people.

Sadly, the reality of much cyber crime today means that significant amounts of personal information and data can be hacked by criminals, which means that the potential threat of identity theft for individuals has multiplied significantly over the last few years.

Identity theft has at its root someone stealing but hugely important information about an individual, such as their date of birth or social security number, as well as information such as employment records etc.

This information was normally sent by post, and individuals were advised to monitor any strange behaviour regarding their post or banking accounts accordingly. In short, identity theft was seen as an off-line problem, that occurred when a criminal managed to somehow obtain very specific and highly important information about an individual.

IDENTITY THEFT PROTECTION

The criminal would then use this information to set up a false identity, and then use that force identity to take out loans, obtain credit  in the individual’s name and immediately default, leaving the original individual with the normally significant debt.

The risk of identity theft, and the need for identity theft protection has grown hugely in the last few years, in large part because of the vast amount of personal information that is kept by a wide range of different organisations about a number of individuals.

Some of these organisations do not have pretty good cyber security systems, some of them have at best woefully inadequate computer operating systems, which puts the individuals information at great risk. Identity theft protection needs to be a control part of any cyber security system, and also of any cyber insurance plan that is likely to be in place as well.

The reality is that most  identity theft protection relates to being able to alert an individual or a company that someone’s identity has been stolen, or may have been stolen, and is being used fraudulently.

This normally relates to some type of credit monitoring system which can set up and monitoring commission that will alert end-users to the possibility of identity theft. What is also important to realise with identity theft protection, is that once someone’s identity has been stolen there is actually very little that anyone else can do about it to help.

It is normally done to individual try and negotiate with the various banks or credit card companies and proved to them at a criminal used their identity, rather than the debt being genuine. Obviously the fact that their identity has been stolen, and this can be proved, can be a help in trying to persuade banks or financial institutions that fraud has taken place, but inevitably identity theft protection is likely to be of little help.

 

What is Credit Monitoring?

Credit monitoring is widely associated with the process of credit reports and credit scores, and normally with the process of a loan application for a new car or a mortgage.

It has also been loosely associated with the process of identity theft, not so much as a preventative measure but as a way of helping people deal with any type of identity theft that may have occurred.

Identity theft is already quite well understood by people,  but is one of those areas of life that people very definitely believe happens to other people not to themselves.

There is a real likelihood that this will change significantly over next  few years, and the need for credit monitoring at a significantly improved level may become a major part of  people’s lives.

Identity theft happens when an individual or individuals unknown octane information about someone else that effectively allows them to steal their identity, and take out loans and mortgages in their name which they then  default on and abscond with the money.

The original individual is then left with these debts in their name, and often faces  an uphill struggle to prove that it was not them that took out these loans in the first  place.

The risk of identity theft is likely to increase hugely as the risk of a data breach in many organisations increases significantly.

As data breaches occur, primarily but not exclusively in the healthcare industry, identity theft will increase substantially.

CREDIT MONITORING

This in part is because the information stolen is unique to the individual, such as their date of birth and Social Security number. This information cannot be changed in the way that a credit card number can be.

At the moment there is relatively little protection for the individual if their  identity is stolen. Some home insurance policies offer identity theft protection, but this normally relates to some type of credit monitoring to make the individual aware that this has happened to them.

That is relatively little help by way of helping the individual proof that the theft has happened and that the debts they are now facing  were in fact run up by someone else.

There is a likelihood that credit monitoring will need to be improved significantly different ways in order to act as a much greater first line of defence both for the individual concerned, and for any organisation or business where the data breach led to that information being stolen in the first race.