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New Generation Of Cyber Security Leaders Needed

“As technology continues to evolve at lightning speed, redefining the way we live and work, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to imagine functioning without it.

Unfortunately, that reliance on technology to keep us connected has also made us more vulnerable to cyberattacks and threats that undermine the ability to keep our data safe.

Our future online safety depends on investing in a work force that understands how to protect us online.”

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A Paperless Society

Although apparently a hardware problem, rather than any type of virus or malicious attack, this incident in the NHS trust shows the dangers of relying on technology. Pennine Acute trust had to cancel approximately 650 appointments because of an IT failure.

Whatever the benefits of IT, and there are many, in the area of health care, there is an obvious and basic need to make sure that any failure does not lead to this type of situation.

Technology should was act as a backup to main systems of care in the health service, and should never be solely relied upon. This type of breakdown highlights the enormity of what it means to  technology as the prime mover behind records and appointments in the NHS.

People sometimes treat IT almost as an ideology, believing it can solve most of life’s problems. Technology is at its best when it is working with other types of systems, especially paper ones, which complement each other and neither of which compromised in the event of any breakdown or failure in the system.

Manchester Evening News

Rise Of Cyber Crime – Virtual Kidnapping

A Chinese student fled her Vancouver home in fear after online scammers threatened to harm her parents in China if she did not comply with their demands. Police say she’s one of three in the last month who have fallen prey to the extortion scheme.

All three victims and their families suffered financial loss in the so-called virtual kidnapping scheme, and the one who fled was eventually found in China.

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How Smart Bandages could Change Healthcare

A wound dressing that detects the first signs of infection is more than just a Band-Aid solution for the University of Victoria researchers who developed it.

University of Victoria bioengineer Mohsen Akbari believes the “smart bandage” could transform wound care and help reduce chronic and deadly infections.

Akbari was lead investigator for a study on the “smart bandage” and associated app that was published Sept. 25 in the journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.

The study concluded that the combined pH-sensitive GelDerm wound dressing, which changes colour in the presence of bacteria was as effective as comparable commercially available systems for detecting bacterial infections.

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Taking back your Online Privacy

There’s a strong chance you’ve recently seen an email or pop-up box offering “some important updates” about the way a social media company or website plans to use your data. Are we about to regain control of our personal information?

In our increasingly connected world, data has come to be seen as something to buy and sell.

Businesses offer personalised goods and services to consumers, raising the possibility of data driving economic growth and even improving wellbeing.

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Hacking Las Vegas ……..

In what could have been the plot of a Hollywood heist movie, the hackers took great interest in the vast aquarium that a Las Vegas casino had installed in its lobby.

The casino’s owners thought that the huge fish tank was an impressive sight that helped create a classy ambience as people arrived.

What they failed to realise was that the aquarium was an easy way to break into the casino’s computer system, and the hackers pounced.

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Dangers of Data Sharing In Healthcare

The (UK) government has been accused of failing to act on “serious concerns” raised by doctors and MPs about an NHS policy that sees patient details shared with immigration authorities.

The Health and Social Care Committee warned earlier this year that NHS Digital was failing to uphold the interests of patients with the existing memorandum of understanding (MoU), through which patient data held by NHS Digital is shared with the Home Office for immigration tracing purposes.

It followed an evidence session on the subject in January, which heard that illegal immigrants were “too frightened” to access healthcare because of the data-sharing agreement, with many being “driven underground” by the legislation.

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How your Browser can Betray you …..

Web browsers store an incredible amount of sensitive information about you. Website developers have a variety of ways of using modern browsers to customize the experience for users. Advertisers also use these features to maximize the impact of ads shown on sites.

The result is that a lot of information about you is stored deep in your browser, and it can potentially be exploited by cyber criminals in a number of ways. This blog will describe what we call the “web dossier” that can be created from these artifacts, how this profile can be exploited, and what you can do to protect yourself.

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How Artificial Intelligence is changing Corporate Canada

Corporate Canada is starting to wake up to AI. Name any sector and you’ll find at least one established player that has experimented with it – not the stuff of Terminator or 2001: A Space Odyssey, machines with human-level consciousness and perception, but software in narrower areas of machine learning.

Artificial-intelligence technology has advanced enough that algorithms can perform as well or better than humans at recognizing speech and images – and outperform us at solving certain problems or predicting outcomes. “I think [corporate executives] are starting to see a disadvantage to their business if they don’t have an active, applied machine-learning or AI project that is delivering results,” said Integrate.ai CEO Steve Irvine.

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Sony goes into Smart Homes

Sony today announced a collection of new products that it plans to showcase during the IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin, Germany this upcoming weekend. One of the biggest additions to the company’s line-up is a new smart home speaker, called the LF-S50G wireless speaker, which looks similar to Apple’s upcoming HomePod, has a built-in Google Assistant, and is being pitched with a “high quality” music-focused message.

Users can start off music playback by saying “OK Google,” and from there they can ask the assistant for any information that it normally provides, including basic trivia, unit conversions, nutritional information, recipes, and more. The sides of the speaker have an LED clock display, while the top includes various sensors that support gesture controls for starting a song, skipping a song, and adjusting volume.

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How Google is taking over Your Home

Google’s push to place its digital assistant, the search giant’s new product centrepiece, inside every consumer appliance imaginable is edging forward.

The Alphabet Inc. unit announced on Wednesday that its voice-based chat service is now compatible with a wave of home devices, including speakers and everyday household appliances like refrigerators. A

fter arriving on Google’s smartphone and speaker in 2016, the company hopes its chat-bot can field regular search queries and become a vehicle for online commerce.

On that front, Google faces stiff competition from Amazon.com Inc., which is also trying to spread its digital assistant Alexa. For example, on Wednesday Amazon and Microsoft Corp. announced a deal to make their digital assistants talk to each other.

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Big Data Key to Fighting Disease

A major part of this effort is now also being focused on improving the data about the impact that AMR is having on global health in a bid to convince policymakers that more needs to be done, and faster, to meet the challenge.

Key to this approach will be use of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project – a hugely influential epidemiological study that has mapped the worldwide impact of diseases and other health risks since the 1990s – to publish comprehensive data on how many people are being affected and being killed by drug-resistant infections.

Alan Lopez, a co-founder of the original study and now laureate professor at the University of Melbourne, said much like GBD data on lung cancer had helped to press home the case for governments to tackle smoking, incorporating AMR into the project could be vitally important.

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Big Data Helping People Back into Work

Worxica is a labour market information research tool built for use by Canadian job seekers, students, and employers.

After entering a job title and location, they can see a summary showing the number of applicable local job ads advertised over the past year, who has been hiring, the typical annual wages offered, skills and certifications required, and more. Users can then click on any reported metric to dive into the job postings it was retrieved from.

Worxica was built to help Canadians make informed decisions when planning and executing their next career move. “Big Data and Artificial Intelligence technology advances are already revolutionizing the way employers hire workers and monitor productivity.

Isn’t it time for job seekers to reap some benefits too?” asks Strac Ivanov, president and CEO of Vicinity Jobs. “For over a decade, we have been collecting information from online job postings for Canadian government economists, universities, and labour market researchers. Through Worxica, we are putting much of this information in the hands of Canadians looking for work.”

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iPhone Data at Risk

While Facebook desperately tightens controls over how third parties access its users’ data – trying to mend its damaged reputation – attention is focusing on the wider issue of data harvesting and the threat it poses to our personal privacy.

Data harvesting is a multibillion dollar industry and the sobering truth is that you many never know just how much data companies hold about you, or how to delete it.

That’s the startling conclusion drawn by some privacy campaigners and technology companies.

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Threat of Cyber Attacks to Global security

Cyber attacks are now the third-largest threat facing the world, following natural disasters and extreme weather, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report 2018, released Wednesday.

A World Economic Forum (WEF) executive summary said that cybersecurity risks have grown “both in their prevalence and in their disruptive potential.”

Some of the biggest risks, the report noted, were attacks against critical infrastructure and connected industrial systems—many of which can cause physical harm in the process. Some examples given in the report were WannaCry, Petya, and NotPetya.

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Equifax Hack and Protection

Equifax customers should request a credit freeze from all three major credit bureaus to ensure hackers behind a massive data breach can’t exploit their stolen information, a leading consumer advocacy group said Friday.

The National Consumer Law Center is calling on Equifax to pay for the freezes, which would prevent anyone from seeking a person’s credit information without their authorization.

“It’s the most effective measure against new identity theft when it involves Social Security numbers, dates of birth — the gold mine of information these hackers stole,” said Chi Chi Wu, a staff attorney with the law center. “It prevents existing creditors and new creditors from using your information. And it prevents new accounts in your name.”

Equifax, one of the three major U.S. credit bureaus, said Thursday that “criminals” exploited a U.S. website application to access files between mid-May and July of this year.

The hackers obtained consumers’ names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some cases, driver’s license numbers. The purloined data can be enough for crooks to hijack victims’ identities, potentially wreaking havoc on their lives. Equifax said its core credit-reporting databases don’t appear to have been breached.

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When Your TV is watching You …….

Users of Samsung’s Smart TV devices have raised concerns over the device’s privacy policy, which seems to suggest that they should not discuss any sensitive topics in their living room while the television is plugged in.

The warning relates to the product line’s voice recognition services, which lets users control their television with voice commands input through a microphone on the set’s remote control.

Samsung privacy policy warns: “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party through your use of voice recognition.”

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Here we go, Here we go ……

Sex toy maker We-Vibe has agreed to pay customers up to C$10,000 (£6,120) each after shipping a “smart vibrator” which tracked owners’ use without their knowledge.

Following a class-action lawsuit in an Illinois federal court, We-Vibe’s parent company Standard Innovation has been ordered to pay a total of C$4m to owners, with those who used the vibrators associated app entitled to the full amount each. Those who simply bought the vibrator can claim up to $199.

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When Dolls aren’t so Friendly ….

An official German watchdog has told parents to destroy an internet-connected doll because hackers can use it to spy on children.

My Friend Cayla was found to be equipped with an insecure Bluetooth device, which cybercriminals could hijack, in order to steal personal data and listen and talk to the child playing with it.

Germany’s Federal Network Agency (Bundesnetzagentur) has now warned parents to destroy it, according to the BBC.

The doll answers users’ questions by accessing the web, but also asks for sensitive personal information, such as the user’s name, school, parents’ names and hometown.

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The Dangers of Smartphone Malware

A recently patched bug found in the chips used to provide wifi in iPhones, Samsung Galaxies and Google Nexus devices could be used to build malware which jumps unstoppably from device to device, according to Nitay Artenstein, the researcher who discovered the flaw.

Affected users should update their phones’ operating systems immediately, to iOS 10.3.3 (released 20 July) or the July security update for Android, which contain fixes for the flaw.

Dubbed Broadpwn, the vulnerability was revealed in detail for the first time on Thursday at the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas. It works by taking advantage of a number of specific flaws in wifi chips made by the component company Broadcom, ultimately allowing an attacker to write programs directly on to the chip, seizing control of it.

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